Book Review All Quiet on the Western Front

I thought that the book “All Quiet on the Western Front” by Erich Remarque was very interesting. It gave me more information on ww1, a topic I knew almost nothing about. I, at first, found it a little odd that the book was written from a German soldier’s point of view, but I quickly threw that type of thinking out the window because Germans have the right to write about a war that they fought in just as an American can. Throughout the book Remarque helps us understand and imagine how gruesome and terrifying it is to fight on the front lines. I think that the way he did it was brilliant because throughout the book I could feel Paul Bäumer’s fear, reluctance, exuberance, and anger.
In the book Paul Bäumer went home only a handful of times, but when he did he always told us how he felt out of place and that if he thought about the front too much he would fall apart, “I can not feel at home amongst these things. There is my mother, there is my sister, there my case of butterflies, and there is the mahogany piano-but I am not myself there. There is a distance, a veil between us.” (pg 142). We talked about it a little bit in class about how back then therapy wasn’t really an option so you couldn’t get help for your PTSD or if you are struggling to fit back into civilian life. I think that Bäumer needed someone to talk to about the fear and anxiety that one gets from being in the war and from the things you see and experience in it, but he doesn’t have anyone to talk to. His family wouldn’t understand because they haven't experienced what happens in war and they couldn’t possibly imagine the horrors that Bäumer has seen. When his mother asks about the war and about the gas that another soldier was talking about, Bäumer thinks about telling her what he has seen gas could do, but to keep his mother from worrying about him he decides not to. “Should I tell her how we once found three enemy trenches with their garrison all stiff as though stricken with apoplexy? Against the parapet, in the dug-outs, just where they were, the men stood and lay about, with blue faces, dead.” (pg 143) He couldn’t talk to his fellow soldiers either because they are trying to keep anything that concerns the front buried, and not think about it.
My topic of research was on women in ww1. By the time I started researching we were reading chapters eleven and twelve so my research didn’t affect the way I read the book that much. I was able to make a few comparisons between my research and the book.
I thought that the book “All Quiet on the Western Front” by Erich Remarque was very interesting. It gave me more information on ww1, a topic I knew almost nothing about. I, at first, found it a little odd that the book was written from a German soldier’s point of view, but I quickly threw that type of thinking out the window because Germans have the right to write about a war that they fought in just as an American can. Throughout the book Remarque helps us understand and imagine how gruesome and terrifying it is to fight on the front lines. I think that the way he did it was brilliant because throughout the book I could feel Paul Bäumer’s fear, reluctance, exuberance, and anger.
In the book Paul Bäumer went home only a handful of times, but when he did he always told us how he felt out of place and that if he thought about the front too much he would fall apart, “I can not feel at home amongst these things. There is my mother, there is my sister, there my case of butterflies, and there is the mahogany piano-but I am not myself there. There is a distance, a veil between us.” (pg 142). We talked about it a little bit in class about how back then therapy wasn’t really an option so you couldn’t get help for your PTSD or if you are struggling to fit back into civilian life. I think that Bäumer needed someone to talk to about the fear and anxiety that one gets from being in the war and from the things you see and experience in it, but he doesn’t have anyone to talk to. His family wouldn’t understand because they haven't experienced what happens in war and they couldn’t possibly imagine the horrors that Bäumer has seen. When his mother asks about the war and about the gas that another soldier was talking about, Bäumer thinks about telling her what he has seen gas could do, but to keep his mother from worrying about him he decides not to. “Should I tell her how we once found three enemy trenches with their garrison all stiff as though stricken with apoplexy? Against the parapet, in the dug-outs, just where they were, the men stood and lay about, with blue faces, dead.” (pg 143) He couldn’t talk to his fellow soldiers either because they are trying to keep anything that concerns the front buried, and not think about it.
My topic of research was on women in ww1. By the time I started researching we were reading chapters eleven and twelve so my research didn’t affect the way I read the book that much. I was able to make a few comparisons between my research and the book. I was looking for how to write a synthesis question cause writing is not my strongest suit. What luck, I’ve found a lot of templates on this website. I paid nothing to read them.


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